Welcome to the FAQ page

This is where you will find the answers to "frequently asked questions".

Literacy (3)
Information about school support services

What are the comprehension strategies I should be teaching my students?

There are seven comprehension strategies that are key to becoming a proficient reader: * Activating relevant, prior knowledge before, during, and after reading text. * Determining the most important ideas * Asking questions of themselves, the authors, and the text they are reading. * Creating visual and other sensory images during and after reading. * Drawing inferences. * Retelling or synthesizing what they have read * Using a variety of fix-up strategies to better comprehend what you are reading when you are having understanding the text problems (Adapted from Mosaic of Thought, Keen and Zimmerman, 1997)

How does 6 traits connect to Process Writing?

Writing is taught using a process approach that allows students the time and opportunity for prewriting, drafting, sharing, revising, and editing their work. This process is the foundation of the writing program. The traits do not replace the process they simply provide a language to strengthen the process and provide students a focus for revision.

What are the 6-traits of writing?

The six traits are nothing new. They are the language for describing the qualities that most writers consider important in good writing. These six traits: ideas, organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency and conventions, provide a common language for teachers, students and parents to talk and think about writing. The 6-trait model of writing assessment and instruction is being implemented in many East Bay Schools as a strategy to improve student writing across the curriculum.

KITES (5)
The "Kits in Teaching Elementary Science" Program

What does my school need to do to get involved?

Schools usually start by trying out kits with a few teachers to see if it's for them. We can help with orientations for teachers, administrators and parents.

Can my school particpate in KITES, even if we are not a member of the East Bay Collaborative?

Yes,schools are calling all the time to see how they can participate. Call (401) 245-4998 ext 315.

How can I be sure if KITES is for my school?

The KITES Program is part of a national movement that supports an inquiry-centered approach to learning science. There is a great deal of research that suggests that student achievement is enhanced with this kind of program. In addition, the connection is being made between improved reading and writing scores of students who engage in inqury science experiences where thse skills are emphasized. The El Centro data supports this claim.

How do you know that kit-based science instruction is better than traditional science instruction?

A great deal of research has come out in the past 5 years that supports higher student scores on standardized tests in science for kids who are engaged in this kind of science. In addition, scores for student go up dramatically in reading, writing and math when science is taught this way in an integrated fashion. See Mike Klentchy's report on his results in El Centro, CA as well as the data from Pittsburg's ASSET Program.

What is the "KITES" Program all about?

"KITES" is the name we have given to our East Bay Collaborative K-6 Science Curriculum. It stands for "Kits in Teaching Elementary Science". In 1994, the East Bay Educational Collaborative received a $5M grant to initiate science reform in grades K-6. Our reform model is based on the premise that 5 areas must be addressed: top-notch standards-based curriculum materials, a system of replenishment and delivery to teachers, an on-going program of professional development, a way to assess the program and its effectiveness with students, and a program to build community and administrative support. The KITES curriculum is based on the use of science curriculum materials in the form of kits that were developed through funding from the national Science Foundation supporting national standards for science. There are programs like ours happening all across the country.

HELMSS (2)
The "High Expectations for Learning in Middle School Science" Program

What happens in the HELMSS Program?

During the 2002/2003 school year, middle school teachers from 15 districts in Rhode Island are participating in 4 graduate level courses from Rhode Island College to prepare them to be the teacher leaders for the remaining middle school teachers in their districts.

What is HELMSS and how does it compare with KITES?

HELMSS stands for "High Expectations for Learning in Middle School Science". It is the grade 7-8 counterpart to KITES which is for grades K-6.

Science Materials Resource Center (9)
Information on science materials support

How can I get a kit if my district/school does not use kits yet?

Call the Science Materials Resource Center at 1-401-245-4998 ext. 316 to discuss your needs and situation. We will do our best to support you.

My district uses kits from the Science Materials Resource Center, but I didn’t get one. How do I get one?

Call the Science Materials Resource Center at 1-401-245-4998 ext. 316. We will look into why you are not on the database and make sure you get a kit. It is critical that our records are updated when teachers retire, change grades/schools, change last names, change the number of sections of students they teach in science, go on long term leave, or are new to the district. Please help us keep the data current. Thanks.

How do I get trained in my kit(s)?

East Bay Educational Collaborative holds kit trainings every fall on all the kits in the KITES and HELMSS curricula. Go to the Professional Development screens for elementary and middle school science on this web site for dates and registration. If you are looking for training in other kits, call the Science Materials Resource Center at 401-245-4998 ext. 316 and we will try to refer you to other trainings held in the state.

What do I do with kit materials I found in my room, after I sent the kit back?

Please mail them back to: East Bay Educational Collaborative, 317 Market Street, Warren, RI 02885. All returned usable materials help to reduce the cost of the materials supply system.

When do I have to return my kit?

The kit is due at your school’s office, or designated pick-up place, the evening before the RETURN DATE on the label on your kit. (The Return Date can also be found in the Teacher/Kit Schedules on this web site.) The kit should be inventoried, dry and packed per the ‘Packing Tips’ in the kit. Your district driver will be picking up kits from all the district schools and returning them to the Science Materials Resource Center on the date indicated on the label.

If material is broken or unusable at the end of the kit, what do I do?

Please throw out dead batteries, broken items, and items that are no longer in usable condition and indicate it on the inventory list. Teachers and students are the quality control experts in the materials supply system. You know best how the material works in the classroom. We, at the Science Materials Resource Center, rely on your expertise and feedback.

What do I do if my animals arrive dead or die shortly after delivery?

Call Berkshire Biological at 1-413-527-3932. It is helpful if you have the number on the packing slip that came with the delivery. They will replace the animals immediately. If you need further help, call the Science Materials Resource Center at 1-401-245-4998 ext.316.

Who can I call if material is broken or missing in my kit?

Call the Science Materials Resource Center --- 401-245-4998 ext. 316 ---and we will replace the item(s)immediately, with our sincere apologies. We usually ship UPS and you should receive the materials within 1-2 days. Our goal is to send you 100% teacher-ready kits. When we make mistakes, we NEED to know so we can fix them for you and other teachers in the system. Please call, thank you.

What is my kit schedule?

Go to Science Materials Resource Center---Teacher Schedules. Click on your district (or private school name) and scroll down the data by school for your name. If there is anything wrong with the data we have on your schedule, please call the Science Materials Resource Center at 401-245-4998 ext. 316 so we can correct it.

Career Academy (6)
East Bay's Alternative High School program

How can I get more information on enrolling a student in EBCA?

Parents may call their local district schools to inquire as to the procedure that their specific district follows regarding admittance to the Academy. They may also inquire through the Academy’s Director, A. William Josephs at 401-245-7978 ext. 314.

What are the benefits for the Districts that sent their students to the EBCA?

The EBCA is a district-friendly, experienced staff. * Tuition is significantly lower than equivalent alternative placements * Our 30-day diagnostic period allows for full evaluation of the student * The program also provides a setting for District 45-Day Placements * The program’s psychologist offers complete assessment and on-going counseling and consultation * Students receive quality educational experiences in a nurturing environment filled with accountability, rewards, and personal growth.

What benefits does it provide for parents?

The program recognizes the need of families and the importance of a cooperative effort. * The open door policy involves parents in their child’s education * The program provides a learning environment for children who may have given up on their education * Improved behaviors in school translate into improved behaviors at home and the community * Intensive attendance policy prevents students from falling through the cracks * The program works as a team with state and private agencies to help meet the needs of your child.

What are the benefits for students who attend the EBCA?

The program focuses on student’s strengths and capabilities, which leads to increased self-confidence and real world achievement. * Students receive school credit for all at-work experiences * Four to one student-teacher ratios allow for quality one-on-one attention * Structured programs are designed with the flexibility to meet the individual needs * Students may participate in the “sending school district” extra curricular activities.

What type of students may be enrolled at the EBCA?

The students that are enrolled are those who are experiencing difficulties with behavioral control, may have an emotional disability, have inadequate structure, attention deficit disorder, or other learning disabilities.

What is the East Bay Career Academy?

An alternative High School program of the East Bay Educational Collaborative for students whose needs are not met in a traditional high school setting. The program serves the districts of the East Bay Area and other surrounding communities. It is located at 317 Market, Warren, RI, 02885.

School Change Facilitation (3)
Principal's Network and Profesional Development offerings

What kinds of resources do you have for school change facilitation?

We maintain an extensive library of books and videos which are available to member districts. Look under "Resources" in our "School Change Facilitation" menu button.

What does the training for literacy coaches involve?

We offer an extensive professional development menu for literacy coaches. Look under "Professional Develpoment Offerings" on our home page.

What kinds of services do you provide in school change facilitation?

Our staff of professional developers work on-site and here at the collaborative to provide training and support for literacy coaches and specialists, as well as school principals.

Vocational Services (3)
Job placement and counseling

Where and when do evaluations take place?

Evaluations are conducted during school hours or directly when students end his/her school day. This is determined at the time of the Intake Meeting. All On-Site Work Experiences are located within the student’s community.

Who is eligible?

Students, who are 14 and older, who have not received vocational testing and require opportunities to determine occupational skills, and who are not currently working. Students must be potentially eligible to receive services from the Office of Rehabilitation upon completion of the evaluation.

How do you refer a student?

Referrals for vocational services should be made directly to the regional Rehabilitation Counselors (ORS) to insure eligibility. Counselor refers student to the Career Learning Center.

Assitive Technology (5)
Technology for the special needs student

Who will pay for the Assistive Technology?

Assistive Technology that is determined by the IEP team is paid for by the school district. If the technology is for a student in a work situation, sometimes that cost is shared by the Office of Rehabilitation Services (pending ORS eligibility).

an I borrow equipment before I decide to purchase it?

Yes, It is a good practice to borrow equipment and trial devices for a period to determine whether it is an appropriate accommodation for a student.

What resources are available to me at the East Bay Educational Collaborative?

The Assistive Technology Resource Center at the East Bay Educational Collaborative has an adapted computer lab with Mac and PC format computers, provides student evaluations, software demonstrations, and a lending library of AT equipment. Computer training for teachers in small groups on educational software is provided by appointment. All teachers and related service providers are encouraged to participate in technology training that will enable them to support students in a wide array of educational technology.

How can Assistive Technology help?

To a child who cannot use their own voice assistive technology can be a communication device or picture/symbol system that enables them to communicate their thoughts and needs. To a child with a visual impairment assistive technology may be magnification tools, large print written materials, or a computer that has specialized software to enlarge the screen. To a child with a hearing impairment assistive technology may include an amplification system for the classroom, personal FM device and electronic visual alarms and safety devices. To a child with a reading or learning disability assistive technology may be a computer that reads the text on the screen. To a child with physical impairments assistive technology may include tools that assist them in eating, dressing, creating artwork & playing games with friends. The benefits of Assistive Technology allow students more independence so they may participate at school, home and in their community.

What is Assistive Technology?

Assistive Technology is any tool, equipment or service designed to help you develop, maintain or improve your ability to function in all aspects of your life. Assistive Technology helps people of all ages who may have limitations or disabilities.

Transition Program (4)
Special Services

What should you and your child do about Transition Planning?

Work with the school team to include a transition plan and identify needed services in the IEP when your child is 14, or younger if you feel that it is needed. Discuss all the issues with your son or daughter. Encourage your child to express his or her thoughts and feeling about their future during planning meetings. In transition planning consider: * Employment * Living arrangements/housing for the future * Social and leisure activities * Security, health, and safety needs * Job/career planning.

Transition Planning: Why start early?

It’s important to begin this process early to allow time for planning the services and support needed in the future. Planning should begin at age 14 or younger. * Transition from special education services and its entitlements is complicated. * For students with severe disabilities and complex needs it will take time to put post-school services and supports in place. * Some students will likely be using the services of many agencies and time will be needed to figure out who can do what and who will pay for what.

What‘s in a Transition Plan?

As you plan for transition, your team should think about: * Independent Living--Will the student live on his or her own some day? * Employment--Will the student work and is he or she prepared to work? * Community Participation--Will the student need assistance in traveling in the community, planning recreation and leisure activities. * College/Continuing Education--Will the student be going on for further education or training and are they academically ready?

What is Transition Planning?

Transition means making a change, or going from one place to another. For students with disabilities, transition means going from school to the adult world. It’s important to plan early for this transition - beginning in the teen years - for a successful and rewarding future. Transition planning is part of the IEP (Individual Education Plan) process. Transition planning means: * setting goals, planning and preparing for life after high school, and * making sure that the student’s high school experiences give him or her the skills, connections, and experiences to succeed after high school.

Laboratory Classrooms (17)
Teaching and Learning Team: Chris DeCosta, Dr. Pam O'Day, Judy Droitcour, Dr. Ed Doucette

What is a Laboratory Classroom?

A Laboratory Classroom is a model of job-embedded professional development that pairs an instructional coach and a classroom teacher who are willing to work together to implement best practice and open up their classroom to peer observations and professional conversations.

What does the coach do?

The coach provides instructional support for the lab teacher by

  • Planning curriculum and instruction around standards and assessments
  • Demonstrating best practice in the classroom
  • Co-teaching, observing, and providing feedback
  • Discussing and analyzing student work
  • Facilitating study groups and action research teams
  • Providing school-wide in-service workshops
  • Supporting the principal in arranging for lab visits
  • Facilitating the lab visit protocol

What "best practices" are used?

The coach and teacher agree to implement:

  • Workshop format for instruction
  • The gradual release of responsibility model
  • The thinking strategies that proficient readers and writers use.

Is there a role for the school principal?

The building principal supports the Lab Classroom by

  • Providing time each week for the coach and teacher to plan, teach and debrief.
  • Providing substitutes to release teachers for Lab Classrooms visits.
  • Participating in the Lab Classroom experience.
  • Supporting all building teachers as they implement best practice
  • Attending the leadership series at EBEC
  • Promoting and supporting study groups
  • Providing information about Lab Classrooms to the whole faculty

What grade levels can implement a Lab Classroom?

The Lab Classroom model is appropriate for all grades and content areas K-12.

What training does a teacher need to be a Lab Classroom teacher?

Lab Classroom teachers participate in five full-day professional development experiences per year. The trainings are focused on:

  • Using workshop format as an instructional design tool and management model
  • Using the thinking strategies that proficient readers and writers use
  • Use the gradual release of responsibility model to help students gain independent application of critical think and problem solving competencies
  • Using differentiated instruction and Understanding by Design to create units of study

How do other teachers benefit from the school’s Lab Classroom?

The Lab Classroom design fosters the development of Professional Learning Communities within the school by:

  • Providing tangible examples of best practice
  • Creating time for professional conversations about teaching and learning
  • Providing opportunities for administrators and teacher-leaders to practice the skills of instructional leadership
  • Fostering a natural curiosity about what works to improve student achievement

What are the benefits to the students of being in a Lab Classroom?

Research and our everyday experience validate the strong relationship between best teaching practice and improved student achievement. Lab Classrooms:

  • Create a nurturing environment
  • Demonstrate the efficacy of high academic expectations
  • Create meaningful participation for students.
  • Demonstrate “learning to learn”
  • Fosters the independent use of critical thinking and problem solving strategies

Do all Lab Classroom teachers use the same instructional strategies?

Lab Classroom teachers and coaches make a commitment to learn and implement best practice:

  • Using the workshop format to organize instruction
  • Fostering independent thinking through gradual release of responsibility
  • Modeling the thinking strategies that proficient readers and writers use
  • Differentiating instruction
  • Integrating and transferring these strategies within and across content areas

Does the Lab Classroom help the teacher increase content knowledge?

EBEC's Comprehensive Professional Development opportunities help teachers to understand that disciplinary knowledge is of two types: The content itself and how the content is best learned, understood, and applied in real world situations.

Does the Lab Classroom help teachers as they differentiate instruction?

Absolutely.

The workshop format is a means to organize daily instruction around three necessary and research-based processes of learning:

  • Focus lesson: Teacher establishes the instructional target for all students. During the focus lesson, the teacher models, demonstrates, or read/talks aloud conceptual knowledge, procedural knowledge, vocabulary, or strategy knowledge.
  • Practice: An extended period of time during which instruction is differentiated. Students practice the instructional intent of the focus lessons in:
    a. independently
    b. in pairs or small groups
    c. while conferencing with the teacher
    d. Using appropriately leveled text/material
    e. All of the above with or without teacher intervention
  • Share and Reflect : A brief period during which the students are brought together to share and reflect on their learning.

What are some problems/challenges associated with implementing Lab Classrooms?

  • Providing weekly time for coach and lab teacher to plan for instruction and debrief
  • Providing substitute coverage to release lab teachers & visiting teachers or administrators (Observation protocol is three hours: Prebrief-observation-debrief)
  • Finding time for coaches and lab teachers to attend EBEC professional development days
  • Providing coaching support for all interested lab teachers

What happens in the classroom in the absence of the lab teacher?

Because Lab Classrooms

  • Have well established rituals and routines
  • Have well-defined roles and responsibilities
  • Have students who are taught to work independently, in partners, or in groups
  • Expect students to assume responsibility for accessing both materials and information
  • Expect students to show respect and support for each other at all times

. . . students in Lab Classrooms are typically able to take responsibility for their learning with minimal help and guidance from a substitute teacher.

Are there any systemic change aspects to the Lab Classroom model?

The Lab Classroom model of professional development fosters a school wide conversation about best practice in teaching and learning that leads to increased student achievement. That is the conversation of a Professional Learning Community. The Lab Classroom model supports additional forms of professional development such as:

  • Study groups
  • Strategic planning teams
  • Advisory committees
  • School-community partnerships
  • Departmental demonstrations
  • Whole faculty meetings
  • School and higher education alliances
  • PTO
  • other

Does the Lab Classroom approach advance student personalization in the school?

The instructional design and structures a the Lab Classroom creates an environment in which teachers, students, and administrators know each other very well as persons and as creators of knowledge and learning. That is personalization.

Do parents have a role in a Lab Classroom?

Many Lab Classroom teachers invite parents to participate in the observation protocol - with wonderful results. Parents typically leave with a clear understanding of the deep thinking that their children participate in and a clearer conception of the curriculum.

Why should a school or teacher consider the Lab Classroom approach to teaching?

  • The Lab Classroom school receives much needed support from EBEC.
  • EBEC also provides the Lab Classroom principal, coach, and teacher with focused professional development related to best practice in teaching and learning.
  • Students achievement will increase
  • Lab Classrooms establish a strong foundation for building Professional Learning Communities within the school
  • Lab Classrooms cultivate a network of collaboration within and across districts

History of Lab Classrooms in the East Bay

  • April-May 2003: EBEC Literacy Team visits Denver Lab Classrooms to explore thinking strategies used by proficient learners
  • 2003-2004: Designed EBEC Coaches training around the thinking strategies.
  • 2003-2004: Designed four part leadership series around the thinking strategies
  • April 2004: Return to Denver and PEBC to refine our own Lab Classroom network.
  • June 2004: Present preliminary Lab Classroom proposal to Superintendents of the East Bay.
  • 2004-2005: Created and support EBEC Lab Classroom network of 35 classrooms most at the elementary level with some middle school.
  • 2004-2005: Four part leadership series focused on supporting Lab Classroom model and visitation.
  • January 2005: Ellin Oliver Keene provides kick-off workshop for Lab Classroom network.
  • Early spring 2005 : Lab Classroom coaches and teachers visit each other.
  • Spring 2005: 29 Lab Classroom opened for 250 visitors including 60 principals or aspiring principals
  • Fall 2005: Opened first high school Lab Classrooms
  • 2005-2006: Expanded Lab Classroom model to middle and high school with more on-site support
  • 2005-2006: Provided deeper level of support for coaches on thinking strategies
  • April 2006: Return to Denver and PEBC to focus on secondary content Lab Classrooms and leadership support
  • April-June 2006: Reconfigured secondary Lab Classroom model to provide on-site EBEC Coaching and instructional leadership development
  • September 2006 – June 2007:   Adding additional Lab Classrooms in East Bay Middle and High Schools:  in Mathematics, ELA, Science and Social Studies (as well as other content areas with teachers who volunteer).
Teacher Assistant Program (7)
Info for those looking to become Teacher Assistants

What can people do to prepare for the test?

  • Test-At-A-Glance – This is a 14-page mini workbook on how to prepare for the test. It includes 15 sample questions with answers and explanations. You can access the Test-At-A-Glance over the Internet at the ETS website.  Go to this site directly or also by way of linkages on the website at the RI Technical Assistance Project (RITAP).
  • Test-At-A-Glance – This is a 14-page mini workbook on how to prepare for the test. It includes 15 sample questions with answers and explanations. You can access the Test-At-A-Glance over the Internet at the ETS website.  Go to this site directly or also by way of linkages on the website at the RI Technical Assistance Project (RITAP).
  • Tutorial – In October 2002, the ETS website will have a tutorial that you can access at no charge to practice taking the test via computer.
  • Study Guides – By the end of January 2003, ETS will have available an in-depth Study Guide that includes a 90-question practice test and various instructional materials. You will be able to purchase the guide for $25 per guide. It is designed for use individually but could also be used with groups.

Will there be a paper and pencil version of the test?

  • Starting in January 2003, ParaPro will be administered 6 times during the school year in conjunction with Praxis Test (ETS test for teacher licensure). This testing will accommodate people who prefer a paper and pencil test and people who may want to take the test on their own rather than through a school district as well as those who require Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodations during the 2002-2003 testing year. Persons taking the paper and pencil test will be able to get test results in about 4 weeks.
  • Starting in January 2003, ParaPro will be administered 6 times during the school year in conjunction with Praxis Test (ETS test for teacher licensure). This testing will accommodate people who prefer a paper and pencil test and people who may want to take the test on their own rather than through a school district as well as those who require Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodations during the 2002-2003 testing year. Persons taking the paper and pencil test will be able to get test results in about 4 weeks.
  • By mid-Fall 2002, people can find out more about this test including testing dates and locations; deadlines and procedures for registering; etc., on the internet by going to the ETS website. Go to this site directly or also by way of linkages on the website at the RI Technical Assistance Project (RITAP) at RI College. Testing starts promptly at 8:00 AM . People are instructed to arrive by 7:30 AM to sign-in. ParaPro Paper and Pencil Test administration will take place in conjunction with Praxis testing in 2003 on Saturday, January 11; Saturday, March 8; Saturday, April 26; and Saturday, June 28, 2003 plus two Fall dates.

What will be the primary method of test administration?

  • The most common method of test administration will be by school districts via Internet linkages. In early Fall 2002, ETS will contact each district in RI to see if they would like to participant in the ParaPro Assessment. Each district that chooses to participate will have an identified contact person who will oversee test administration. The computer test can only be administered by school districts. The locations for where the test can be administered will be limited to the schools within each district.
  • The most common method of test administration will be by school districts via Internet linkages. In early Fall 2002, ETS will contact each district in RI to see if they would like to participant in the ParaPro Assessment. Each district that chooses to participate will have an identified contact person who will oversee test administration. The computer test can only be administered by school districts. The locations for where the test can be administered will be limited to the schools within each district.
  • It will be available over the Internet by mid-November 2002.
  • Persons taking the test over the Internet will be able to get immediate unofficial scores and subscores. These scores will also be immediately available to the district.

What are key facts?

  • Test developed by the Educational Testing Service (ETS). This will be an academic assessment of knowledge of, and the ability to assist in instructing, reading, writing, and mathematics.
  • The ParaPro assessment will be delivered in two formats/delivery methods: (1) paper and pencil assessment provided 6 times a year and (2) on demand via the internet at participating school districts.
  • Test developed by the Educational Testing Service (ETS). This will be an academic assessment of knowledge of, and the ability to assist in instructing, reading, writing, and mathematics.
  • The ParaPro assessment will be delivered in two formats/delivery methods: (1) paper and pencil assessment provided 6 times a year and (2) on demand via the internet at participating school districts.
  • At the beginning of the test, there is a 30 minute tutorial to help people get oriented to taking a test on the computer. This is followed by the actual test that takes lasts 2.5 hours. The assessment has 90 items. It is a continuous test. This means that persons taking the test can go back and forth among sections of the test while they are taking it regardless of the delivery method.
  • The test will yield one overall score which will be the score used to determining passage. The test will also yield 6 sub-scores – 3 related to content knowledge and 3 related to application of knowledge and skills to classroom instruction. This will assist the person taking the test to assess his/her strengths and needs and, if needed, target areas of remediation if they need to retake the test.
  • The RI Department of Education will be represented by a team of RI teachers and teacher assistants in a standard setting process that will be carried out by ETS in Fall 2002. The resulting state standard score (passing score) will be recommended to the Board of Regents. It is anticipated that the Board of Regents will adopt the state standard score by the some time after the first of the year (2003).
  • ETS recommends that an individual wishing to retake the test wait 30 days to allow time for that individual to access some type of remediation to help them be better prepared.
  • The test is available only in English.
  • Cost - $40

What has the Board of Regents determined as a passing score for the ParaPro Assessment?

The ParaPro passing score is 461. Although some people will have to retake the test, many are reporting passing. Test takers report the ParaPro Study Guide is a very helpful tool in studying for the test.

Where can I find information about taking the Parapro Assessment?

You can find resources re: Parapro Administration in Rhode Island by going to www.ets.org/parapro and www.ritap.org

When is the next Teacher Assistant Certification Class?

Tuesday-Friday, June 24th-27th, 8:30AM-4:00PM (June 24-26) & 8:30AM-12:30PM (June 27) at EBEC. Contact Sally Ribeiro at 245-4998 x311.

Graduate Courses (2)
Description of Rhode Island College Graduate Courses Offered

How do I sign up for a graduate course?

You can regtister on line att his site, or you call call Bill Josephs at 401-245-4998 x 314.

Do you offer graduate courses?

Yes, there are courses running every semeseter and in the first and second summer sessions through Rhode Island College at the Warren site.

News Journals (1)
Current & upcoming events

When is the next Teacher Assistant Certification Class?

Tuesday-Friday, June 24th-27th, 8:30AM-4:00PM (June 24-26) & 8:30AM-12:30PM (June 27) at EBEC. Contact Sally Ribeiro at 245-4998 x311.

RIPIN (3)
Rhode Island Parent Information Network

How do I contact RIPIN?

RIPIN is only a phone call away! You can reach us at: 1-800-464-3399 or 1-401-727-4144 for further information on the services and programs we offer. Or check out our website at www.ripin.org.

What types of programs does RIPIN have?

RIPIN’s programs include the following initiatives: Transition Services, Early Intervention (EI) Parent Consultant Program, Father and Family Network of Rhode Island, First Book, First Day, Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY), Parent Consultant Program of the Rhode Island Department of Health, Division of Family Health, Parents As Teachers (PAT), Parent Training and Information Center (PTIC) and more. RIPIN offers phone support and in person support to families across Rhode Island.

What is RIPIN?

The Rhode Island Parent Information Network (RIPIN) is a statewide, nonprofit agency that provides information, training, support and advocacy to parents seeking help for their children. RIPIN offers 11 programs and services to families with children in RI, including families of children with special needs.

RILINK (4)
Rhode Island Library Information Network

How can I contact RILINK?

Call Dorothy Frechette, RILINK’s Executive Director, at (401) 245-4998, extension 320, or send email to rilinkatride [dot] ri [dot] net. For more information, check out our web site at www.rilink.org.

What does it cost?

RILINK annual dues are based on student enrollment, $1.50 per student, with a maximum of $1,500 and a minimum of $500 for each individual school library member. An entire school district may join as a group at the rate of $1.00 per student.

Why should my school join RILINK?

The major benefit is increased access to books and information for your students and teachers. As of March 2006 sixty-four RILINK school libraries are sharing more than 500,000 books and other materials, with access to millions more through their membership in the statewide library network. RILINK member school libraries also get significant discounts on library software and for subscriptions to online full-text databases and other services. Schools can also join our RICAT system, a web-based shared system for school libraries, similar to the academic (HELIN, InRHODE) and public library (CLAN) systems in Rhode Island.

What is RILINK?

Through their membership in RILINK, school libraries cooperate to share their books and other materials. Using their combined catalog on the web at www.rilink.org, RILINK members can: *Borrow books for students and teachers, statewide and beyond, for curriculum enhancement, research, reading circles, and enrichment *Make their library catalogs available to parents, students, and teachers on the World Wide Web, from their homes *Provide subject-based, K-12 appropriate access to the other resources on the World Wide Web.